11/9/10

What Book Was...?

 Hello, welcome to Tuesday's Question.  This Tuesday, Tuesday's Question is asked at the end of the post instead of the beginning. If you're new to Tuesday's Question, there's a note for you at the end of the post as well.  Plus, we already have two great answers...

Franz Kafka said,

"A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us.”  `  

I had a hard time thinking of how to phrase today’s question.  I was going to ask you what was the first book you remember reading, and what you liked or disliked about it.  Hence, if you would like to answer that question you may, but I bet the title question will tell you why you felt the way you did about the book you read.

The first book I remember reading, is not my favorite book, but I will be forever grateful for having read it.  Because I couldn’t wait to go back to the library and find another story to step into; a new door to open, and new characters who I could laugh, cry, suffer, dream, and live with until the final word on the last page, and beyond. 

I think what Franz Kafka was saying is that books must crack open our outer shell and speak to our heart, mind, and more importantly our soul.  I think that good books are just about syntax and spellbinding prose, they are about us, and who we are authentically, in addition to our relationship to the rest of the world.   

I remember my feet moving when Scout Finch, the protagonist in To Kill A Mockingbird, (which is my favorite book) was running away from danger.  I was so lost in the pages, I could smell the Finch house, feel the summertime heat, and of course feel the threat of danger.  

 Harper Lee’s book was the axe for the frozen sea in me…What book was the “axe for the frozen sea” in you?    


Note to new readers: When I first started blogging I tried to think of a way to give back to my fellow bloggers, (who gave me awards and linked to my blog) and get to know them at the same time, and it turned out to be  Tuesday's Question.  Now, it's become a great way to get to know all of my readers and give back to the blogging community, in addition to introducing you to each other.  
I guess you're wondering what I mean by "giving back," and introducing you to each other.  Well, after you answer Tuesday's Question, I will post your answer as part of the post, and link it back to your blog. So, you get the benefit of the link and others get to know you by reading your answer.  In addition, I think that chances are if they like your answer, they will like your blog, and I've made it easy for them to visit you by leaving your link. 

If you would rather not participate, that's alright, I'm just happy you're here, and if you do, I love ya for taking the time to make Tuesday's Question what it is today- FUN. 

And I thank you for your loyal support. Speaking of which, I have yet to post the answers to the last Tuesday's Question due to my computers terrible disposition. Therefore, look for them to be posted this week.  

The first answer came from Grace at Hugz Before You Go   who said,
I don't know about any axe for a frozen sea - I can't remember the first book I ever read since I started reading when I was 4 but if I look back the book that has stayed with me more than any other has to be "Little Women" by Louisa May Alcott. Even at the tender age of 10, in the year 1956 I felt that Jo had copped out. But I loved Jo for being her own person despite all odds.

As an adult I read Louisa May Alcott's "blood and thunder" stories and in those stories the rebel woman wins out against the strictures of society.

Louisa called "Little Women" and the sequels "pap for children" but 100 hundred years later at least one child saw through the pap to the power.

Jo March will always be my hero and my first and only, role model.
  

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Another great answer from Sandee at Comedy Plus 


This one is tough to chose. Only one, can't really do that so I'll go with a favorite. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy. It just had everything from so many of the characters perspectives. There was hypocrisy, jealousy, faith, fidelity, family, marriage, society, progress, carnal desire and passion, and the agrarian connection to land in contrast to the lifestyles of the city.


The other thing is the character Levin was Tolstoy. All his beliefs were Tolstoy's. I didn't find that out until much later.


I just found this book so human. The struggles are the same no matter what country you reside or what century you happen to be living.


From where I am sitting I can look at my bookshelf and see that very large book named Anna Karenina. I've kept it all these many, many years.


This was a fun question Annie. I've always enjoyed Tuesday's Question.


Have a terrific day. Big hug. :)

12 comments:

Grace said...

I don't know about any axe for a frozen sea - I can't remember the first book I ever read since I started reading when I was 4 but if I look back the book that has stayed with me more than any other has to be "Little Women" by Louisa May Alcott. Even at the tender age of 10, in the year 1956 I felt that Jo had copped out. But I loved Jo for being her own person despite all odds.

As an adult I read Louisa May Alcott's "blood and thunder" stories and in those stories the rebel woman wins out against the strictures of society.

Louisa called "Little Women" and the sequels "pap for children" but 100 hundred years later at least one child saw through the pap to the power.

Jo March will always be my hero and my first and only, role model.

"Annie" said...

Well, that's what I would call your axe in a frozen sea. (Smile)

I love your comment. There is always an author that reaches in and touches the very heart of us, isn't there?

Thank you Grace~

Sandee said...

This one is tough to chose. Only one, can't really do that so I'll go with a favorite. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy. It just had everything from so many of the characters perspectives. There was hypocrisy, jealousy, faith, fidelity, family, marriage, society, progress, carnal desire and passion, and the agrarian connection to land in contrast to the lifestyles of the city.

The other thing is the character Levin was Tolstoy. All his beliefs were Tolstoy's. I didn't find that out until much later.

I just found this book so human. The struggles are the same no matter what country you reside or what century you happen to be living.

From where I am sitting I can look at my bookshelf and see that very large book named Anna Karenina. I've kept it all these many, many years.

This was a fun question Annie. I've always enjoyed Tuesday's Question.

Have a terrific day. Big hug. :)

"Annie" said...

And I've always loved your answers!

I've heard of Leo Tolstoy, and now I want to get a copy of Anna Karenina. And I love this, "Only one, can't really do that so I'll go with a favorite."

You're right, the writer would have to be pretty dawn good. You're too smart. Although, I have to say, many writers have come mighty close.

Thanks for such a great comment.

Big hug, and love,

Annie

dawn said...

I agree with Sandee... one is hard. The first book I ever read was Ramona... but not my favorite book.
The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe captured my imagination and I will never forget it... but as a child the all time favorite was A Wrinkle In Time. It opened up a whole new world for me.
Of course then there was Little Women and Jane Eyre that left their marks upon my heart. And as an adult I'd have say Ken Follett's Pillars of the Earth was my #1 read.
See? One is not enough... I could go on all night. See? There's another one... NIGHT by Elie Wiesel and Death on the Ice by Cassie Brown... Okay I'll shut up now :)))

Great Question Annie!

Shinade said...

Oh this is a hard question Annie. The first book I remember reading was a biography about Ghengis Khan of all people. I was around eight year old. But, it set the pattern for my reading interests my entire life.

I absolutely love biographical novels, autobiographies and even fiction based on fact!

I have only read one book twice in my life and I think I may be the only person in the world who has read it.

The name of the book is 'Chardash' written by Diane Pearson if memory serves me right. It's a novel about feudalism, the bourgeois and The Bolshevik Revolution.

The characters are fascinating. The main character is from a wealthy family and gives everything up to fight for the revolution.

He truly believed the propaganda about making all people equal, the sharing of the wealth and that communism was the best way.

It really is a wonderful read with a lot of insights into the realism of communism.

I won't ruin the story for anyone by revealing how he learns he has made a terrible error in judgment, but, he does learn and comes to know that no matter what government is in power nothing really changes.

Wow, may be I should have read it again before our last election. Come to think of it, the book is relevant in our current political debacle here at home.

Great question! I hope you have a great day!!
Jackie:-)

jakill said...

I was an avid reader as a child and always being told to put that book down and do something else. So there were probably many earlier books. But the first one that comes to mind is Black Beauty by Anna Sewell. It was the catalyst for my lifelong love affair with horses.

Lauren said...

As a child, I loved all the Dr. Seuss books and two other silly books, one called Mr. Pines Mixed Up Signs, the other A Fly Went By.

It's a tough question. It's been a while since I read my first book. : )

Like you, I remember being deeply touched by To Kill A Mockingbird. I also loved Jane Eyre and Turn of the Screw. I love books that I think about long after I've turned the last page. The Cask of Amontillado also comes to mind, as does A Tale of Two Cities.

Pearl said...

CS Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia:-) I love reading the comments of your readers:-) so informative..now i want to read anna karenina. would have to borrow a copy from the lib:-) Take care!

"Annie" said...

Dawn, Laughing...One is hard, isn't it? I helped with a local children's production of "The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe," and it is still capturing children's (and adults) hearts.

You did the same thing I did, the first wasn't my favorite either, but then again, I cannot answer my own question. :)

I've missed you~

Thanks for such a great comment. (as usual)

And just so you'll know- I cannot take the link for "Twisted Sister" down...I just cannot do it, and I love all of your sites, which you'll have more evidence of now that I have my computer back~

Luvs ya,

Annie

Finding Pam said...

How will I ever choose just one? I loved Jack London books. Hans Christian Anderson fables were some of my favorites. Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger about coming of age.

I adored them all.

I guess if I had to choose just one that I love dearly it would be Wuthering Heights with Cathy and Heathcliff. The love, the hate, the angst, the sorry,and the jealously. This book expressed so many emotions.

Gee, Annie this was hard, but thanks for making me think of some awesome books.

Abram said...

For my part one and all have to go through this.
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